Author Topic: Bi- and trilingual children  (Read 2216 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« on: October 22, 2015, 14:41 »
31/12/2014   Simon

I spent Christmas with my family at my brother’s house in Devon in the south west of England. His daughter is now 20 months old and it’s fascinating to see how she’s acquiring language.

The last time I saw her was at Easter this year when she was nearly a year old. At that time she was able to say a few words, but now she has a lot more words and little phrases, and understands more as well. Most of her words are in English, but she also uses some Russian ones (her mother is Russian) such as сок (juice), and even some BSL signs, such as thank you, picked up from baby signing classes.

As well as English and Russian, she’s picking up some French from the French nanny who looks after her a few days a week while her mother is working. So she is on the way to becoming a polyglot. Whether she’ll be as enthusiastic about languages as I am remains to be seen, but it will be very interesting to see how her language develops.

Do you have or know children who are being raised bilingually or multilingually? Do you have any tips and stories you’d like to share? Guest posts on this topic are very welcome.

-------------

01/01/2015
Knitter says:

I am a native speaker of Polish, my husband is a native speaker of English (American version). Our three sons (ages 24, 20, 18) are fluent in English (we live in US) and semi-fluent in Polish. They have been exposed to the two languages since birth. The interesting thing is that they all learned to speak differently. My oldest son was freely mixing up the two languages first, using words and phrases that were easier to pronounce from either until the age of about 3. Then, somehow “magically” the languages got separated in his head and he was able not only to stick to one or the other, but also translate for his grandmother (who is Polish speaking). My middle son was a very slow starter for speech (until about 3, he was pretty much getting by with “yes” or “no” in both languages), but once he started, he pretty much knew which language he wanted to use. My youngest son started speaking not in single words or phrases, but in full (mostly grammatically correct) sentences at a little over 1 year old and the languages were totally separate. Interestingly enough, he is quite a gifted musician. All three took Spanish in school and it came very naturally to them (even if my middle son “hated languages”) to the point where my oldest son is doing research for his PhD in Mexico (Chiapas) and he is able to function there. What does it all mean? I don’t know, but I think the more the young children are exposed to, the more they learn without trying to learn.

-------------

01/01/2015
David Eger says:

My two nephews (now 10 and 6) live in Germany, go to an international School where they are taught bilingually in German and English and are spoken to by their parents predominantly in English, but with some German in the mix. Both parents are fluent in both English and German, and speak German at home when they have German vsitors. Their father’s native language is Telugu, in which he occasionally speaks to the children; they understand a few phrases but do not speak it themselves. Their father is also fluent in Hindi and may be heard doing business by telephone in any of the four languages mentioned (often switching effortlessly from one to another). The boys occasionally slip a German word into their English – but their parents also do this sometimes. They make a few grammatical errors, some of which are probably typical for children of their ages (e.g. using regular conjugations and inflections where they should be irregular), others (e.g. incorrect prepositions, ‘German’ syntax) more obviously a result of being bilingual.

-------------

01/01/2015
David Eger says:

…Forgot to mention: When the elder boy was ready to start kindergarten, it so happened that the nearest one to their flat was a Jewish kindergarten. They wanted to send him to a bilingual German-English kindergarten. However, the German-English group was fully subscribed, but there was a German-Hebrew group that had space, so he went there. For the time he was there, he acquired som modern Hebrew vocabulary – I don’t know to what extent he was able to converse in Hebrew. I don’t think he has any recollection of Hebrew now. (Although his mother [my sister] is Jewish, his exposure to things Jewish is largely restricted to infrequent visits to his Grandparents in London.)

---------------

01/01/2015
Athel Cornish-Bowden says:

My daughter is fluent in English, Spanish and French, and was exposed to the first two from birth, indeed from before birth, as my wife talked to her in Spanish while she was still in utero. She has been completely bilingual in English and Spanish since the age of about three, adding French from about four onwards (since she started school in France). While were driving across France on our way from England, when she was three, she said something to my wife in Spanish, and then repeated the same thing to me in English. It was clear from that moment that she had worked out which language went with which parent. She never showed the slightest suggestion of being confused between the different languages. Sometimes she would use a French word when speaking English or Spanish if she only knew the French word, but you could always tell from the slight pauses before and after the intercalated word that she knew perfectly well what she was doing. I also noticed that when there were choices she would often use the one that came more naturally to a French speaker, most obviously with the word utilize (in English, utilizar in Spanish), which means the same as use (or usar), but French only offers utilizer, as user is not synonymous. To maintain the parents’ languages I think it’s important to expose the child to as many people as possible that speak the same languages, so that she doesn’t think that her parents are the only ones who speak like that. We took her to England and Chile as often as we could.

--------------

01/01/2015
Athel Cornish-Bowden says:

Correction: French only offers utiliser. I do know how to spell the French word, but just after writing the cognate English and Spanish words I got led astray.

Offline Алcy

  • Posts: 73
« Reply #1on: October 22, 2015, 14:51 »
Most of her words are in English, but she also uses some Russian ones (her mother is Russian) such as сок (juice), and even some BSL signs, such as thank you, picked up from baby signing classes.

Не очень ясно описание ситуации, но часто такая ситуация неприятна. Дети легко путаются в языках, если их области употребления чётко не разграничены.

Если же от одного родителя в одних и тех же ситуациях исходит один и тот же язык, то это нормально.
Иначе, ребёнок выучит тот самый суржик, которым фактически говорит его родитель.

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« Reply #2on: October 22, 2015, 15:13 »
Не очень ясно описание ситуации, но часто такая ситуация неприятна. Дети легко путаются в языках, если их области употребления чётко не разграничены.

Если же от одного родителя в одних и тех же ситуациях исходит один и тот же язык, то это нормально.
Иначе, ребёнок выучит тот самый суржик, которым фактически говорит его родитель.

В более нижних постах описаны же случаи, когда киндер понимает с каким из родителей на каком языке лучше шпрехать. ИМХО если от одного родителя (родителя №1? :) ) то один язык, то другой, то тут ребенок скорее запутается.

Offline Алcy

  • Posts: 73
« Reply #3on: October 22, 2015, 16:16 »
Не очень ясно описание ситуации, но часто такая ситуация неприятна. Дети легко путаются в языках, если их области употребления чётко не разграничены.

Если же от одного родителя в одних и тех же ситуациях исходит один и тот же язык, то это нормально.
Иначе, ребёнок выучит тот самый суржик, которым фактически говорит его родитель.

В более нижних постах описаны же случаи, когда киндер понимает с каким из родителей на каком языке лучше шпрехать. ИМХО если от одного родителя (родителя №1? :) ) то один язык, то другой, то тут ребенок скорее запутается.
Почему, это как раз разные ситуации в жизни ребенка. Только если ребенок будет видеть, что один родитель понимает другого, то тогда он автоматически не будет учить один из языков.

Offline svarog

  • Posts: 2220
« Reply #4on: October 22, 2015, 16:22 »
Из всего, что я читал про многоязычных детей, складывается такой вывод. Не нужно волноваться вообще, что ребенок будет что-то путать. Ребенок однозначно и без проблем выучит язык среды, в которой он живет.

Но нужно волноваться за то, выучит ли ребенок язык родителей. Чтобы это достичь, нужно постоянно говорить и заниматься с ребенком на этом языке.

(Т.е. если родитель непоследователен в использовании языка, у ребёнка никакой путаницы не будет, ребёнок просто не выучит его язык. В лучшем случае будет пассивно понимать).

Offline negat1ve

  • Posts: 53
« Reply #5on: October 22, 2015, 19:34 »
Экскурс в мою небогатую биографию: русский родной, англ начал учить с дет. сада и в англо-школе (все по-английски). Сколько себя помню, всегда спокойно болтал на двух языках, ничего нигде не путал. Сейчас учусь в Англии, мне 18. Разве что с друзьями (они тоже на обоих шпрехают) часто говорим на русинглише. А так, по-моему для ребенка это исключительно полезное занятие. Вреда точно не вижу. Был бы только рад если б еще и иврит знал... :umnik:
ПыСы. Родители со мной по-английски никогда не говорили, с обучением тоже не помогали.
God save the Queen

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« Reply #6on: October 23, 2015, 07:50 »
Разве что с друзьями (они тоже на обоих шпрехают) часто говорим на русинглише.
И как этот русинглиш выглядит? Что в нем от руса, а что от инглиша?

Offline negat1ve

  • Posts: 53
« Reply #7on: October 23, 2015, 10:20 »
Да просто слова из обоих языков в перемешку говорятся. Забыл слово на одном языке - запихнул это слово на другом языке в предложение на первом, и все всё поняли. Но структура и грамматика предложения не ломается при этом. Еще бывает говорим по-английски с ужасно русским акцентом, но это так, когда делать нечего. Попробую привести пример:
Здарова, хау ду ю ду?
Хорошо, ю?
Сэйм, дид ю си зэ офигенный фейерверк йестердэй?
Угу, бьютифул, вот бы каждый день пускали. А ты на пати ходил?
Не, ай воз вэри вэри бизи, некст тайм.

Ну где-то что-то вроде этого как-то да :no:
God save the Queen

« Reply #8on: October 23, 2015, 23:29 »
zwh, а вы где язык выучили?
God save the Queen

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« Reply #9on: October 24, 2015, 13:51 »
zwh, а вы где язык выучили?
Немецкий -- в школе. Там была пятерка, но достаточно много я, конечно, забыл уже, потому что поддерживаю его крайне нерегулярно. Английский -- сперва самостоятельно, потом -- в рамках второго высшего.

Offline Leo

  • Posts: 26866
« Reply #10on: October 24, 2015, 19:05 »
Но нужно волноваться за то, выучит ли ребенок язык родителей. Чтобы это достичь, нужно постоянно говорить и заниматься с ребенком на этом языке.
тоже тяжко, среда давит сильно

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« Reply #11on: October 24, 2015, 20:07 »
Но нужно волноваться за то, выучит ли ребенок язык родителей. Чтобы это достичь, нужно постоянно говорить и заниматься с ребенком на этом языке.
тоже тяжко, среда давит сильно
Вроде обычно иммигранты теряют язык предков в третьем поколении (это если интегрируются в среду, а не в Чайнатауне или на Брайтон-Бич живут, и если нет сильной идеологической компоненты в воспитании).

Offline Алтаец

  • Posts: 117
« Reply #12on: October 24, 2015, 20:38 »
У меня сын с рождения рос в двуязычной среде - русской и английской (хотя больше в русской), но смешивал слова только на самом раннем этапе, когда только начинал говорить. Года в два он уже говорил исключительно на русском.
Si non vis cacare, podicis non cruci!

Offline zwh

  • Posts: 11758
« Reply #13on: October 24, 2015, 22:16 »
У меня сын с рождения рос в двуязычной среде - русской и английской (хотя больше в русской), но смешивал слова только на самом раннем этапе, когда только начинал говорить. Года в два он уже говорил исключительно на русском.
А английский он отверг и забросил?

Offline Алтаец

  • Posts: 117
« Reply #14on: October 26, 2015, 04:34 »
А английский он отверг и забросил?

Нет, он прекрасно его понимал, просто предпочитал говорить по-русски.
Собственно, и до сих пор так происходит (сейчас ему 14 лет).  :)
Он может смотреть фильмы на языке оригинала или играть в компьютерные игры без перевода, но разговаривает по-английски только тогда, когда его специально об этом попросишь.
Si non vis cacare, podicis non cruci!

 

With Quick-Reply you can write a post when viewing a topic without loading a new page. You can still use bulletin board code and smileys as you would in a normal post.

Note: this post will not display until it's been approved by a moderator.
Name: Email:
Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image
Type the letters shown in the picture:
√49 Напишите ответ строчными буквами:
«Сто одёжек, все без застёжек» — что это?: