Author Topic: mine  (Read 7077 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Amina

  • Posts: 44
« on: April 5, 2009, 20:33 »
Я тут в книге встретила "mine host". То есть хозяин таверны был назван просто так "mine". Это в смысле любопытный? словарь мне не помог

Offline Wolliger Mensch

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 48552
  • Haariger Affe
    • Подушка
« Reply #1on: April 5, 2009, 20:38 »
Не очень понятно, о чем вы спрашиваете. Что за текст? Mine host, например, может значить просто «мой хозяин».
«Вот интересно, каких лингвистических жемчуг можно найти в море отодвинутых книг», Ян Гавлиш.
«Впредь прошу помнить, что придумал игру не для любых ассоциаций, а для семантически оправданных. Например, чтó это такое: „рулетке“ — „выпечке“?? Тем более, что сей ляпсус я сам совершил…», Марбол
«Ветхий Завет написан на иврите и частично на армейском», Vesle Anne
«МЛ(ять)КО … ПЛ(ять)NЪ», Тася
«Вот откроет этот спойлер, например, Марго, ничего не подозревая, а потом будут по всему форуму блюющие смайлики…», Авал

Offline Amina

  • Posts: 44
« Reply #2on: April 5, 2009, 20:44 »
Может, конечно, но как-то нелогично это. Впрочем, может просто так сказано. Это из хижины дяди тома

Offline Beermonger

  • Posts: 2988
  • One badass monkey
« Reply #3on: April 5, 2009, 20:45 »
Фразу целиком приведите пожалуйста.

Offline Ванько

  • Posts: 4409
« Reply #4on: April 5, 2009, 20:47 »
Quote
determiner
3) (preceding a vowel) an archaic word for my
mine eyes
mine host

Quote
A. adjective. = MY adjective. Used attrib. before a vowel or h (arch.) or as the first of two or more possess. adjectives qualifying the same following noun. Also (arch.) used with emphatic force following any noun. Cf. THINE adjective. OE.

Swift  A little below the level of mine eyes.  
C. A. Bristed  There, reader mine! Is that last page grave..enough for you?  
J. Conrad  I venture to ask that mine and Mr Razumov's intervention should not become public.  
P. G. Wodehouse  I entered the saloon bar and requested mine host to start pouring. 
Lingvoforum has ruined my life.
-------------------------
ЛФ — это вообще к лингвистике мало имеет отношение. © RawonaM

Offline Wolliger Mensch

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 48552
  • Haariger Affe
    • Подушка
« Reply #5on: April 5, 2009, 20:52 »
Может, конечно, но как-то нелогично это. Впрочем, может просто так сказано. Это из хижины дяди тома

Почему нелогично? В старом языке форма mine употреблялась иногда перед гласными и h в значении местоименного прилагательного. Это, скорее всего, тот самый случай.
«Вот интересно, каких лингвистических жемчуг можно найти в море отодвинутых книг», Ян Гавлиш.
«Впредь прошу помнить, что придумал игру не для любых ассоциаций, а для семантически оправданных. Например, чтó это такое: „рулетке“ — „выпечке“?? Тем более, что сей ляпсус я сам совершил…», Марбол
«Ветхий Завет написан на иврите и частично на армейском», Vesle Anne
«МЛ(ять)КО … ПЛ(ять)NЪ», Тася
«Вот откроет этот спойлер, например, Марго, ничего не подозревая, а потом будут по всему форуму блюющие смайлики…», Авал

Offline Gerbarius

  • Posts: 254
« Reply #6on: April 5, 2009, 21:08 »
Может, конечно, но как-то нелогично это. Впрочем, может просто так сказано. Это из хижины дяди тома

Почему нелогично? В старом языке форма mine употреблялась иногда перед гласными и h в значении местоименного прилагательного. Это, скорее всего, тот самый случай.

Я думаю, это нелогично, потому что повествование идёт не от первого лица.

Вот отрывок из "хижины дяди Тома", где упоминается этот самый "mine host".
Quote
It was late in a drizzly afternoon that a traveler alighted at the door
of a small country hotel, in the village of N----, in Kentucky. In the
barroom he found assembled quite a miscellaneous company, whom stress of
weather had driven to harbor, and the place presented the usual scenery
of such reunions. Great, tall, raw-boned Kentuckians, attired in
hunting-shirts, and trailing their loose joints over a vast extent of
territory, with the easy lounge peculiar to the race,--rifles stacked
away in the corner, shot-pouches, game-bags, hunting-dogs, and little
negroes, all rolled together in the corners,--were the characteristic
features in the picture. At each end of the fireplace sat a long-legged
gentleman, with his chair tipped back, his hat on his head, and the
heels of his muddy boots reposing sublimely on the mantel-piece,--a
position, we will inform our readers, decidedly favorable to the turn
of reflection incident to western taverns, where travellers exhibit
a decided preference for this particular mode of elevating their
understandings.

Mine host, who stood behind the bar, like most of his country men, was
great of stature, good-natured and loose-jointed, with an enormous shock
of hair on his head, and a great tall hat on the top of that.

In fact, everybody in the room bore on his head this characteristic
emblem of man's sovereignty; whether it were felt hat, palm-leaf, greasy
beaver, or fine new chapeau, there it reposed with true republican
independence. In truth, it appeared to be the characteristic mark of
every individual. Some wore them tipped rakishly to one side--these
were your men of humor, jolly, free-and-easy dogs; some had them jammed
independently down over their noses--these were your hard characters,
thorough men, who, when they wore their hats, _wanted_ to wear them, and
to wear them just as they had a mind to; there were those who had them
set far over back--wide-awake men, who wanted a clear prospect; while
careless men, who did not know, or care, how their hats sat, had them
shaking about in all directions. The various hats, in fact, were quite a
Shakespearean study.

Divers negroes, in very free-and-easy pantaloons, and with no redundancy
in the shirt line, were scuttling about, hither and thither, without
bringing to pass any very particular results, except expressing a
generic willingness to turn over everything in creation generally
for the benefit of Mas'r and his guests. Add to this picture a
jolly, crackling, rollicking fire, going rejoicingly up a great wide
chimney,--the outer door and every window being set wide open, and the
calico window-curtain flopping and snapping in a good stiff breeze
of damp raw air,--and you have an idea of the jollities of a Kentucky
tavern.

Your Kentuckian of the present day is a good illustration of the
doctrine of transmitted instincts and pecularities. His fathers were
mighty hunters,--men who lived in the woods, and slept under the free,
open heavens, with the stars to hold their candles; and their descendant
to this day always acts as if the house were his camp,--wears his hat
at all hours, tumbles himself about, and puts his heels on the tops of
chairs or mantelpieces, just as his father rolled on the green sward,
and put his upon trees and logs,--keeps all the windows and doors
open, winter and summer, that he may get air enough for his great
lungs,--calls everybody "stranger," with nonchalant _bonhommie_, and
is altogether the frankest, easiest, most jovial creature living.

Into such an assembly of the free and easy our traveller entered. He was
a short, thick-set man, carefully dressed, with a round, good-natured
countenance, and something rather fussy and particular in his
appearance. He was very careful of his valise and umbrella, bringing
them in with his own hands, and resisting, pertinaciously, all offers
from the various servants to relieve him of them. He looked round the
barroom with rather an anxious air, and, retreating with his valuables
to the warmest corner, disposed them under his chair, sat down, and
looked rather apprehensively up at the worthy whose heels illustrated
the end of the mantel-piece, who was spitting from right to left, with
a courage and energy rather alarming to gentlemen of weak nerves and
particular habits.

"I say, stranger, how are ye?" said the aforesaid gentleman, firing an
honorary salute of tobacco-juice in the direction of the new arrival.

"Well, I reckon," was the reply of the other, as he dodged, with some
alarm, the threatening honor.

"Any news?" said the respondent, taking out a strip of tobacco and a
large hunting-knife from his pocket.

"Not that I know of," said the man.

"Chaw?" said the first speaker, handing the old gentleman a bit of his
tobacco, with a decidedly brotherly air.

"No, thank ye--it don't agree with me," said the little man, edging off.

"Don't, eh?" said the other, easily, and stowing away the morsel in
his own mouth, in order to keep up the supply of tobacco-juice, for the
general benefit of society.

The old gentleman uniformly gave a little start whenever his long-sided
brother fired in his direction; and this being observed by his
companion, he very good-naturedly turned his artillery to another
quarter, and proceeded to storm one of the fire-irons with a degree of
military talent fully sufficient to take a city.

"What's that?" said the old gentleman, observing some of the company
formed in a group around a large handbill.

"Nigger advertised!" said one of the company, briefly.

Mr. Wilson, for that was the old gentleman's name, rose up, and, after
carefully adjusting his valise and umbrella, proceeded deliberately to
take out his spectacles and fix them on his nose; and, this operation
being performed, read as follows:

     "Ran away from the subscriber, my mulatto boy, George. Said
     George six feet in height, a very light mulatto, brown curly
     hair; is very intelligent, speaks handsomely, can read and
     write, will probably try to pass for a white man, is deeply
     scarred on his back and shoulders, has been branded in his
     right hand with the letter H.

     "I will give four hundred dollars for him alive, and the
     same sum for satisfactory proof that he has been _killed."_

The old gentleman read this advertisement from end to end in a low
voice, as if he were studying it.

The long-legged veteran, who had been besieging the fire-iron, as before
related, now took down his cumbrous length, and rearing aloft his tall
form, walked up to the advertisement and very deliberately spit a full
discharge of tobacco-juice on it.

"There's my mind upon that!" said he, briefly, and sat down again.

"Why, now, stranger, what's that for?" said mine host.

"I'd do it all the same to the writer of that ar paper, if he was
here," said the long man, coolly resuming his old employment of cutting
tobacco. "Any man that owns a boy like that, and can't find any better
way o' treating on him, _deserves_ to lose him. Such papers as these
is a shame to Kentucky; that's my mind right out, if anybody wants to
know!"

"Well, now, that's a fact," said mine host, as he made an entry in his
book.

Offline Amina

  • Posts: 44
« Reply #7on: April 5, 2009, 21:13 »
Тогда что же это значит?

Offline Wolliger Mensch

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 48552
  • Haariger Affe
    • Подушка
« Reply #8on: April 5, 2009, 21:14 »
Вот отрывок из "хижины дяди Тома", где упоминается этот самый "mine host".

Ну есть же milady, milord, которые и в третьем лице могут употребляться. Может быть, это того же типа образование, только более позднее?
«Вот интересно, каких лингвистических жемчуг можно найти в море отодвинутых книг», Ян Гавлиш.
«Впредь прошу помнить, что придумал игру не для любых ассоциаций, а для семантически оправданных. Например, чтó это такое: „рулетке“ — „выпечке“?? Тем более, что сей ляпсус я сам совершил…», Марбол
«Ветхий Завет написан на иврите и частично на армейском», Vesle Anne
«МЛ(ять)КО … ПЛ(ять)NЪ», Тася
«Вот откроет этот спойлер, например, Марго, ничего не подозревая, а потом будут по всему форуму блюющие смайлики…», Авал

Offline Beermonger

  • Posts: 2988
  • One badass monkey
« Reply #9on: April 5, 2009, 21:18 »
Просто архаизм имхо. Эквивалентно "my host" в современном.

Offline regn

  • Posts: 4922
  • čia nieko nėra
« Reply #10on: April 5, 2009, 21:23 »
Просто архаизм имхо. Эквивалентно "my host" в современном.

в Британии 100% есть места, где и сейчас можно услышать "mine host". Ровно как и "thou knowest".

Offline Beermonger

  • Posts: 2988
  • One badass monkey
« Reply #11on: April 5, 2009, 21:27 »
Просто архаизм имхо. Эквивалентно "my host" в современном.

в Британии 100% есть места, где и сейчас можно услышать "mine host". Ровно как и "thou knowest".
Я в курсе. Но в литературном языке это - архаизмы.

Offline regn

  • Posts: 4922
  • čia nieko nėra
« Reply #12on: April 5, 2009, 21:36 »
Я в курсе. Но в литературном языке это - архаизмы.

Да, разве что в поэзии такое увидишь :)

Offline Xico

  • Posts: 9320
  • Cansado
« Reply #13on: April 5, 2009, 21:53 »
Да, разве что в поэзии такое увидишь
Не только.

host
   
Quote
often humorous the landlord or landlady of a pub: mine host raised his glass of whiskey. ∎  the moderator or emcee of a television or radio program.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O999-host.html

Mine Host
   
Quote
noun
   1 a person who receives or entertains guests.
   2 the presenter of a television or radio programme.
   3 a person, place, or organization that holds and organizes an event to which others are invited.
   4 often humorous the landlord or landlady of a pub: mine host raised his glass.
   5 Biology an animal or plant on or in which a parasite lives.
   6 the recipient of transplanted tissue or a transplanted organ.
http://www.jbvisions.co.uk/voices/archives/73
Veni, legi, exii.

Offline Andrei N

  • Posts: 2877
« Reply #14on: April 5, 2009, 22:15 »
Кстати насчет GVS. Mine / mijn совпадения или нет?
[здесь должно что-то быть]

Offline Xico

  • Posts: 9320
  • Cansado
« Reply #15on: April 5, 2009, 22:23 »
Кстати насчет GVS.
Goat Veterinary Society ?
Goes Very Speedily?
Government Veterinary Surgeons?
General Vision Services?
Grande Vitesse Systems, Inc (San Francisco, California) ?
Global Vision System ?
Ground Vehicle Stopper ?
Gage Variation Study ?
Ground Vehicle Systems ?
Ground Vibration Study ?
Ground Voice System ?
Golden Valley Supply ?
Veni, legi, exii.

Offline Andrei N

  • Posts: 2877
« Reply #16on: April 5, 2009, 22:27 »
Goat Veterinary Society ?
Goes Very Speedily?
Неужели я так непонятно изъясняюсь??? Я имел ввиду [wi=en]Great_Vowel_Shift[/wi].
[здесь должно что-то быть]

Offline Xico

  • Posts: 9320
  • Cansado
« Reply #17on: April 5, 2009, 22:33 »
Mine / mijn совпадения или нет?
В смысле? Был ли аналогичный сдвиг в нидерландском?
Veni, legi, exii.

Offline Andrei N

  • Posts: 2877
« Reply #18on: April 5, 2009, 22:42 »
В смысле? Был ли аналогичный сдвиг в нидерландском?
Почему в столь далеких друг от друга языках происходят на столько подобные сдвиги и почти одновременно? Еще удивляют "goed", "nieuw". Получается, что разными путями пришли почти к одному.
[здесь должно что-то быть]

Offline Xico

  • Posts: 9320
  • Cansado
« Reply #19on: April 5, 2009, 22:57 »
Почему в столь далеких друг от друга языках происходят на столько подобные сдвиги и почти одновременно?
Не такие уж они и далёкие.
Получается, что разными путями пришли почти к одному.
Именно, что "почти", и то не всегда.
Veni, legi, exii.

Offline Andrei N

  • Posts: 2877
« Reply #20on: April 5, 2009, 23:22 »
Именно, что "почти", и то не всегда.
Вот именно. Иногда на одних местах, иногда на разных. Напр. koud, about. А вот что касается верхненемецкого, то он, кажется, со своими удэ пошел по второму кругу.
[здесь должно что-то быть]

« Reply #21on: April 5, 2009, 23:23 »
Не такие уж они и далёкие.
А что их объединяет? По-моему только то, что они принадлежат к западногерманской ветке и больше ничего.
[здесь должно что-то быть]

Offline Wolliger Mensch

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 48552
  • Haariger Affe
    • Подушка
« Reply #22on: April 5, 2009, 23:37 »
Еще удивляют "goed", "nieuw". Получается, что разными путями пришли почти к одному.

Не разными путями (пути-то там были почти те же), а независимо друг от друга (хотя, этот вопрос тоже интересный: здесь скорее нужно говорить о параллельном развитии общих тенденций).
«Вот интересно, каких лингвистических жемчуг можно найти в море отодвинутых книг», Ян Гавлиш.
«Впредь прошу помнить, что придумал игру не для любых ассоциаций, а для семантически оправданных. Например, чтó это такое: „рулетке“ — „выпечке“?? Тем более, что сей ляпсус я сам совершил…», Марбол
«Ветхий Завет написан на иврите и частично на армейском», Vesle Anne
«МЛ(ять)КО … ПЛ(ять)NЪ», Тася
«Вот откроет этот спойлер, например, Марго, ничего не подозревая, а потом будут по всему форуму блюющие смайлики…», Авал

Offline Xico

  • Posts: 9320
  • Cansado
« Reply #23on: April 6, 2009, 00:14 »
По-моему только то, что они принадлежат к западногерманской ветке и больше ничего.
Это уже немало. Да и географически, и исторически Нидерланды и Фландрия были связаны с Англией. Известно, что фламандцы повлияли на лексику английского языка.
Veni, legi, exii.

Offline Amina

  • Posts: 44
« Reply #24on: April 6, 2009, 12:15 »
Xico, thanks! Исчерпывающе

 

With Quick-Reply you can write a post when viewing a topic without loading a new page. You can still use bulletin board code and smileys as you would in a normal post.

Note: this post will not display until it's been approved by a moderator.
Name: Email:
Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image
Type the letters shown in the picture:
√49 Напишите ответ строчными буквами:
«Сто одёжек, все без застёжек» — что это?: